Baby Names of the Week: Davian and Layla

Another week has passed and once again we have the baby name contest winners. After last week’s Draydon and Sparrow, the path has reversed and we are turning back to slightly more established names.                                                 Ladies and gentlemen, welcome our darlings of the week: Davian Mikael and Layla Shay!

Call it a force of habit, but we will once again try to help you understand these names, hopefully with a little hint from the parents as for what inspired them to favor these names.

Davian might seem a little unusual at first, but in fact it is a modernized form of David, possibly influenced by other names, such as Ian. As a male given name it hit the popularity ranks in the 2000s, becoming increasingly trendy in the very recent years. So far, there aren’t many references to this name, other than Davian Clarke, a Jamaican athlete and a bronze medal winner in the 4 x 400 meters relay at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta. Unlike Davian, its original predecessor David is one of the oldest names of all times. Originating in Hebrew and meaning adored or beloved, it is nowadays used all over the world in hundreds of different forms and spellings. And as the Bible tells us, the most famous bearer was probably David, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Jesus Christ’s ancestor.

Layla is unquestionably a much older and conventional name than Davian. Rooted in Arabic language, it means the woman of the night and currently, it is used in different spellings in many countries around the world, most frequently as Leila. Majnun Layla, translated into English as The Madman and Layla, is a classic Arabic love story, last adopted as a poem by Nizami Ganjavi, a Persian poet. But who are we kidding with literature, everybody knows Layla as Eric Clapton’s famous love song with its unbeatable guitar and piano. If you’re still wavering whether to like the name or not, just play that 1992 Unplugged version and you’ll fall for it in a flash!

Both Davian and Layla are on the more traditional side, yet with a twist of uniqueness. I can’t help but fancy the good old David over the ‘rejuvenated’ Davian version, but tastes differ. And we all know, dear moms and soon-to-be moms, this couldn’t be more true in the world of baby naming. Or would you think otherwise? Enlighten us right here in our comment section!

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